Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Build Your Own Inkle Loom

This was the first model of inkle loom I owned. 


The very first inkle loom I owned was one which I made in the 1970's with the help of my dad.
 I still remember discovering what a hole saw and L brackets were. The plans came from the book "Inkle Loom Weaving" by Nina Holland. The loom was two-sided, but the second side was not removable, which makes it harder to use. Also, the tension adjustment left much to be desired. So, when I was able to buy one of a better design, I did. I no longer have either of these looms.











When I had young children, in the 1980's and early 90's, I made them each an inkle loom from a cardboard  box, which worked just fine. I don't think that they got used much. All 3 of my kids do know how to use an inkle and I'm glad for that. If you want to make your own cardboard box loom, I highly recommend these instructions by JacQueline Keller on her blog Hearts on Fibre. She's a very clever lady!  Hearts on Fibre

There is another do-it-yourself inkle loom which doesn't require woodworking tools and skills; it is made of PVC pipe. Weaving Today has included plans in their free download. You can find it here:
Weaving Today- Guide to Inkle Weaving

If you have the skills or ability to build one from wood, there are a variety of plans out there on the internet. The tutorial here on Make Magazine's website, looks good to me, although I have not used the plans myself. How To: Build an Inkle Loom

The book "Inkle Weaving" by Helene Bress has plans for building both a table top/lap inkle and a floor-standing inkle. I have one of the floor-standing models built by a friend and can testify that it is a good design.

Have you made your own inkle loom? If so, I'd really like to hear from you about what plans you used and what you like about your model. Please leave a comment below.



7 comments:

  1. I made a PVC one and rather hate it. It'd be great if what you wanted to do was card weaving, but for standard inkle weaving, it's pretty horrible to make & change sheds. At least that's my personal opinion, others may feel differently.

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    1. Thanks for your response, Peg. I have been wondering about these. Did you use the plans from Weaving Today?

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  2. The looms I got from my grandfather are like that, permanently two sided. He had also made one with the two upright sections that could be unscrewed so I could pack it for college. I've built a couple using wood from a broken IKEA headboard, copying the dimensions of his. They work OK, but need more pegs added to the design to increase the length. Here's a link to a picture: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10201803403352536&set=a.10200566563832321.71666157.1405605553&type=3&theater

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    1. Thanks for that link, Tracy. There is something very satisfying about building one's own tools.

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  3. My husband made me a beautiful floor-standing inkle loom from Helen Bress's book. I have been using it for years and love it. It is nice and substantial and admired by all who see it.

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    1. Anne, I also have this one and rather like it when I need to do something long.

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